BiasAlerts

On Tuesday, New York Times reporter Timothy Williams led his story from Baghdad, "Now With Foothold in Iraq, Oil Companies Look to the Future " with a "blood for oil" accusation the hard left has been making for years, couched as something that supposedly "many believed." More than six and a half years after the United States-led invasion here that many believed was about oil, the major oil companies are finally gaining access to Iraq's petroleum reserves. But they are doing so at far less advantageous terms than they once envisioned. One could also accurately say that "many believe" President... continue reading
Good Morning America host Diane Sawyer on Tuesday badgered Robert Gibbs from the left, quizzing the White House press secretary about Democratic resistance to a troop surge in Afghanistan. She began by fretting, " Is this the last time the President is going to ask for American troops from the American people? " After Gibbs mentioned the dangerous threat of al Qaeda, Sawyer reiterated, "...If the generals come back in six months and say, we need just another 10,000, another 15,000 to finish this job, you're saying the answer will be no?" The GMA host, who will become the new... continue reading
Writing for Newsweek magazine's feature on the top ten "startling scoops" of the past ten years, ex-CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather identified the most shocking: "Abu Ghraib has opened our eyes, serving as a dark icon that reminds us our fiercest enemies - hubris, cruelty, and ignorance - wage war from within." Rather went on to proclaim that the prisoner abuse scandal "is still the subject of debate and the source of despair, a shadowy gateway to learning how these wrong-headed practices became American policy." Early in the brief article, Rather claimed: "Many don't know that the story aired... continue reading
Previewing the President's speech tonight, NBC's Matt Lauer invited on Karl Rove, on Tuesday's Today show, and pressed the former White House senior adviser if the reason Afghanistan still required the U.S.'s attention is because the previous administration "took its eye off the ball in Afghanistan," and "concentrated too heavily on Iraq." Rove hit back, accusing Lauer and Bush administration critics of "revisionism." And later, when Lauer questioned if there were enough "resources" to counter the Taliban resurgence in Afghanistan Rove fired back that any one in the Obama administration was in no position to criticize: "Well look, first of... continue reading
ABC's David Wright again attacked Sarah Palin on Tuesday, slamming her for using a private jet for her book tour. On Good Morning America, he sniped, " But, while her fans camped out in the bitter cold, just for the chance to meet her, the former vice presidential candidate was quietly traveling in style, aboard this Gulfstream II private jet. Price tag, $4,000 an hour. " [Audio available here .] Introducing the segment, co-host Diane Sawyer chided, "And [Palin] frequently can be seen photographed in front of the bus that she took on the road. But people have been watching... continue reading
Serving as a stenographer to Obama operatives trying to magnify the import of the President's schedule for the week, CBS anchor Katie Couric on Monday night trumpeted: White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel says this will be an 'historic week in an already historic year,' with the Afghanistan decision, the Senate opening debate today on a health care reform bill, and the President's schedule jam packed. "Jam packed" with fairly pedestrian activities and political gimmicks, though Couric treated them as consequential, starting with how "today the President met with Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd" and "later in the week,"... continue reading
In a 10,500 word story on the state of the Republican Party, Washington Post staff writers on Monday waited until paragraph 36 of a 37 paragraph article to highlight the overwhelming belief that the press is biased against Republicans. Jon Cohen and Dan Balz belatedly noted, "One rallying point for the GOP, though, is a broad perception among moderates, conservatives, and younger and older Republicans alike that television news is biased against the Republican Party and tilted highly in favor of Obama and Democrats ." [Emphasis added.] Additionally, the print edition of the paper featured 15 charts about what respondents... continue reading
The first question in a poll conducted by CBS's 60 Minutes and Vanity Fair magazine asked Americans to nominate a fifth face for Mt. Rushmore and included Barack Obama among the contenders. While President Kennedy took the lead with 29%, Obama came in fourth with 16%, just behind Franklin Roosevelt at 18% and Ronald Reagan at 20%. On Monday's CBS Early Show, co-hosts Harry Smith and Maggie Rodriguez discussed the poll with CBSNews.com's Cali Carlin and Vanity Fair's Michael Hogan. Smith thought the Rushmore question was "terrific" and guessed that "it's got to be between Kennedy and FDR." Rodriguez made... continue reading
CBS devoted half of Sunday's Face the Nation to the pressing question of "divisions within the Republican Party: Is there room for moderates?" Fill-in host Harry Smith of the Early Show allowed guests Dick Armey and Ed Gillespie plenty of time to reject his premise, but he forwarded the media's widely-held presumption in a series of statements as he simply cued up Dede Scozzafava, the Republican who endorsed the Democrat in the special New York House race: "Do you think you were too moderate?" To Armey and Gillespie, Smith cited a list of principles some in the GOP want candidates... continue reading
In the past several days, FNC has given attention to the plight of three Navy SEALs who helped capture one of the most wanted terrorists in Iraq - a man named Ahmed Hashim Abed who is believed to have planned the savage murder of four Blackwater security guards in Fallujah in 2004. Due to accusations of prisoner abuse by Abed, these American troops are now facing the possibility of court-martial. On Wednesday's Special Report with Bret Baier, correspondent Steve Centanni began his report: It was March of 2004. Fallujah was a hotbed of insurgent activity. Four Blackwater contractors were ambushed... continue reading