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Only ABC Marks 100 Days for Dem Rule, Failure to Pass Promises --4/16/2007


1. Only ABC Marks 100 Days for Dem Rule, Failure to Pass Promises
Back in January, ABC anchor Charles Gibson was the most triumphant over supposed Democratic achievements after taking control of Congress. But on Friday night, only Gibson's World News, of the three broadcast network evening newscasts, reported on the failure of Democrats to pass the bills they promised in their first one hundred days. Gibson had trumpeted on January 4 how video of Speaker Nancy Pelosi on the House floor holding a baby while she talked to colleagues demonstrated "the ultimate in multitasking: Taking care of the children and the country" and two weeks later he celebrated how House Democrats "completed their scheduled hundred hours of work in just about 42 hours, so they can put the other 58 in the bank." On Friday night's World News, Jake Tapper made clear how they've come up very short, pointing out how the Democrats "have no major legislative accomplishments to mark this anniversary. None of their 'Six for '06' campaign promises last year have made it to the President's desk."

2. GMA Embraces Gov Arnold on Environment; Touts 'Presidential Buzz'
Good Morning America, which will participate in a day-long push for liberal environmental action on April 20, on Friday touted the "long way" California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has come in adopting left-wing policies. GMA co-host Diane Sawyer asserted that the former actor is now trying "to save the planet for real." ABC anchors Sawyer and Chris Cuomo seem to have found a Republican that they actually like. Both hosts repeatedly mentioned Schwarzenegger and the presidency (an office he's ineligible to seek). Cuomo gushed: "You're on the cover of Newsweek magazine. Frustrating that you can't be on the national stage running for President?"


Only ABC Marks 100 Days for Dem Rule,
Failure to Pass Promises

Back in January, ABC anchor Charles Gibson was the most triumphant over supposed Democratic achievements after taking control of Congress. But on Friday night, only Gibson's World News, of the three broadcast network evening newscasts, reported on the failure of Democrats to pass the bills they promised in their first one hundred days. (Brian Williams' lead on NBC: "A new and growing political problem for the White House: Missing e-mails.") Gibson had trumpeted on January 4 how video of Speaker Nancy Pelosi on the House floor holding a baby while she talked to colleagues demonstrated "the ultimate in multitasking: Taking care of the children and the country" and two weeks later he celebrated how House Democrats "completed their scheduled hundred hours of work in just about 42 hours, so they can put the other 58 in the bank."

On Friday night's World News, Gibson explained: "When Democrats took control of the Congress in January, they promised it would be a new day. They'd get things done. They even had a checklist. Well, a hundred days after taking control, we've checked the checklist." Jake Tapper made clear how they've come up very short, pointing out how the Democrats "have no major legislative accomplishments to mark this anniversary. None of their 'Six for '06' campaign promises last year have made it to the President's desk." Tapper listed several bills which passed in the House but have yet to be reconciled with the Democratic Senate and he noted how Democrats have "conducted twice as many oversight hearings over the Bush administration as Republicans did last year." Tapper concluded, through the perspective of Democrats, on a hopeful note: "Democratic leaders know conflict with the White House is not enough for voters. So in the next hundred days they'll try to deliver on the promises of their first hundred days."

[This item was posted Friday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

See the January 5 CyberAlert, "Gibson on Pelosi: 'Taking Care of the Children and the Country,'" for more on his January 4 remark and video of it: www.mrc.org

See the January 19 CyberAlert for "Gibson Toasts House Democrats for Finishing 100 Hour Agenda in 42," online at: www.mrc.org ]

Charles Gibson introduced the April 13 World News story: "When Democrats took control of the Congress in January, they promised it would be a new day. They'd get things done. They even had a checklist. Well, a hundred days after taking control, we've checked the checklist. Here's our senior political correspondent, Jake Tapper."

Jake Tapper: "The anniversary of the Democrats' takeover of Congress one hundred days ago was greeted with scorn today by Republicans."
Senator Trent Lott: "Here we are, on Friday the 13th, discussing the first 100 days of the 110th Congress. They're gone, may they rest in peace."
Tapper: "Democrats, after all, have no major legislative accomplishments to mark this anniversary. None of their 'Six for '06' campaign promises last year have made it to the President's desk."
Senator Mitch McConnell: "The result of that of course is that nothing has been accomplished."
Tapper: "Democrats in the House and Senate have passed bills [list on screen] allowing funding of embryonic stem cell research, increasing the minimum wage, implementing 9/11 commission recommendations and funding the Iraq war while requiring troops to start withdrawing. But Democratic leaders have yet to reconcile the House and Senate versions of these bills and send them to the White House. And while campaigning last year Democrats emphasized the laws they would pass, today they say their success should be judged differently."
Senator Charles Schumer: "Change, accountability and oversight have become more than words, they've become our mission."
Tapper: "Democrats conducted twice as many oversight hearings over the Bush administration as Republicans did last year -- on Iraq, the fired U.S. Attorneys, the environment, the list goes on. And this new dynamic has led to chest-thumping standoffs between the White House and Capitol Hill."
President Bush on March 19: "They have a responsibility to get this bill to my desk without strings and without delay."
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, March 28: "Calm down with the threats. There's a new Congress in town."
Tapper: "Democratic leaders know conflict with the White House is not enough for voters. So in the next hundred days they'll try to deliver on the promises of their first hundred days. Jake Tapper, ABC News, Capitol Hill."

GMA Embraces Gov Arnold on Environment;
Touts 'Presidential Buzz'

Good Morning America, which will participate in a day-long push for liberal environmental action on April 20, on Friday touted the "long way" California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has come in adopting left-wing policies. GMA co-host Diane Sawyer asserted that the former actor is now trying "to save the planet for real." ABC anchors Sawyer and Chris Cuomo seem to have found a Republican that they actually like. Both hosts repeatedly mentioned Schwarzenegger and the presidency (an office he's ineligible to seek). Cuomo gushed: "You're on the cover of Newsweek magazine. Frustrating that you can't be on the national stage running for President?"

A sampling of their comments:

# Chris Cuomo: "In fact, he's out in front of one of the biggest political issues facing our time and he has a lot of presidential buzz surrounding him, even though he's not allowed to run."

# Cuomo, to Schwarzenegger: "You're on the cover of Newsweek magazine. Frustrating that you can't be on the national stage running for President?"

# Cuomo: "You do, though, think about what it would be like to run for President if you could?"

# Diane Sawyer: "So, he dreams about being President, but can't be?"

Sawyer and Cuomo teased the segment, which ultimately aired at 7:42am on April 13, by noting how much the California Governor has evolved in his thinking:

Sawyer: "He's come a long way, trading in his Hummer for a hybrid. Move over, the Terminator is actually going to become the man who tries to save the planet for real here. It is the green giant, I don't buy jolly in Schwarzenegger case. We'll find out from Chris Cuomo because he sat down with the Governor."

Chris Cuomo: "Absolutely. You can see what he's trying to do there, be on MTV, is make the environment cool. And he is on top of the world. He is taking an issue that a lot of politicians are avoiding. He's owning it. His poll numbers are up and he's talking about everything. He is jolly."

[This item, by Scott Whitlock, was posted Friday on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

A transcript of the segment:

Diane Sawyer: "He's come a long way, trading in his Hummer for a hybrid. Move over. The Terminator is actually going to become the man who tries to save the planet for real here. It is the green giant, I don't buy jolly in Schwarzenegger case. We'll find out from Chris Cuomo because he sat down with the governor."
Chris Cuomo: "Absolutely. You can see what he's trying to do there, be on MTV, is make theenvironment cool. And he is on top of the world. He is taking an issue that a lot of politicians are avoiding. He's owning it. His poll numbers are up and he's talking about everything. He is jolly."

Cuomo: "Arnold Schwarzenegger has undergone an incredible transformation to think, the five time Mr. Universe, and action hero is now respected more for his political muscle. In fact, he's out in front of one of the biggest political issues facing our time and he has a lot of presidential buzz surrounding him, even though he's not allowed to run. Mr. Governor, no surprise to you, you are on the cover of '€˜Newsweek. You are being called the Green Giant. In this piece, it says you're filling the vacuum that Washington is leaving because of how you are trying to control greenhouse gases in your state. You don't see answers to the environmental problem coming from Washington do you?"
California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger: "Well, I think they are very slow. You know, I think that they're, I'm sure making an effort, but I think the effort that they're making is not big enough, not fast enough, of what needs to be done in the world right now."
Cuomo: "You've used the word embarrassing, how the federal government is responding to this issue."
Schwarzenegger: "Well, I think that, I wish there was much more leadership there and that we can be a great example, like I said, for the rest of the world. So, what we have to do is set goals for ourselves, how to reduce it, and turn the clock back. We know that 40 percent of the greenhouse gasses come from the cars. And so, we have to really, also set very tough standards there, '€˜cause if they don't make the changes in Detroit, you know, the Japanese will, the Chinese will, the South Koreans will, the Germans will. So, they will steal the business away. And we have already seen how successful the Japanese, with their cards, with their hybrid cars. And, so, we want Americans to be successful. You can't open up a newspaper or magazine. I went on a newsstand yesterday, and there was literally nine cover stories all about global warming."
Cuomo: "Did you stand over the shoulder of any purchaser there saying why are you buying that magazine when there's this handsome man right there?"
Schwarzenegger: "I immediately threatened them, absolutely. I was there as the terminator and threatened them."
Cuomo: "You're on the cover of Newsweek magazine. Frustrating that you can't be on the national stage running for President?"
Schwarzenegger: "You know, I don't concentrate on the things I can't do. Because if I look at what I was able to accomplish because I'm in America, that is staggering."
Cuomo: "You do though think about what it would be like to run for President if you could?"
Schwarzenegger: "Oh, yes. Absolutely. I've thought about what it would be like to be an Olympic champion in shot putt. I've thought about a lot of things, what it would be like to be Bill Gates. You know, I mean, of course. You see those things in front of you, it's always fun to dream about those things."
Cuomo: "Do you think, when you look at the crop of candidates to take over President Bush's job do you see somebody there with the courage to take on the big issues?"
Schwarzenegger: "I think there are several candidates. Like, for instance, among the Republicans, if you think about McCain and Rudy Giuliani, both the of them are talking about the environment."
Cuomo: "Do you have in your headed who you think is going to win?"
Schwarzenegger: "Not at this point, no."
Cuomo: "Do you have a favorite?"
Schwarzenegger: "Not yet."
Cuomo: "Do you have a least favorite?"
Schwarzenegger: "No. Not yet" .
Cuomo: "Do you have someone in the middle?"
Schwarzenegger: "No. I'm not going to go there.
Cuomo: "Let me ask you something else, little bit of a different subject, which picture are you more proud of, this Arnold or this Arnold?" [Cuomo holds up a Muscle Fitness magazine with Arnold flexing and the Newsweek cover about Arnold saving the planet.]
Schwarzenegger: "Well, in the days I was doing body building, I was most proud of a cover like this."
Cuomo: "I mean, look at that."
Schwarzenegger: "I know. Look at those biceps."
Cuomo: "Come on."
Schwarzenegger: "And look at the deltoids. Don't forget the abs."

Sawyer: "So, he dreams about being President, but can't be?"
Cuomo: "Right. But he could play a huge role. Because he wants to talk about these big issues and he's so popular, he could shame the other candidates into addressing the environment and health care. He could do it."
Sawyer: "Wasn't there a movement to make it possible for those born outside of the country to be President?"
Cuomo: "It's tough to change the Constitution."

-- Brent Baker