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MRC's Brent Bozell talks about media bias on FNC's The Kelly File, 9:30pm ET/PT Thursday

NBC: Iraqis Want U.S. to Stay, Anti-War Effort Helping Insurgents --3/6/2007


1. NBC: Iraqis Want U.S. to Stay, Anti-War Effort Helping Insurgents
Visiting Iraq, NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams learned from Army officers that Iraqis want U.S. forces to remain in their country, from NBC News Baghdad reporter Richard Engel that Al-Sadr's insurgents have stepped down and are counting on pressure from anti-war opponents to provide them with victory, and from retired General and NBC News military analyst Wayne Downey that U.S. troops are proud of their mission. Traveling with Lieutenant General Ray Odierno for stories on his Monday newscast, Williams ran a clip of Army Colonel John Charlton proclaiming that Iraqis "do not want us to leave" and a soundbite from Army Lt. Colonel Charles Ferry who asserted: "The people here are very glad to see us." To explain the decreased violence in Baghdad, Engel noted how "the militia decided they fought the U.S. two-and-a-half years ago, didn't have a lot of success. They decided this time they're going to wait it out, see if political pressure in the U.S. can help them win this time." Downey related how "every soldier that I ran across today I asked him: 'How do you feel about what's going on,'" and "without exception....very proud of what they're doing."

2. MSNBC's Brewer on Hillary and Obama: We're Rooting for Them All
On Monday afternoon, MSNBC anchor Contessa Brewer discussed the competing Sunday speeches of 2008 Democratic presidential candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in Selma, Alabama. During the 3pm EST hour, Democratic strategist Julie Roginsky reeled off all the racial and cultural firsts that the upcoming primaries will have, including Hispanic candidate Bill Richardson, gushing: "There are so many firsts in this Democratic primary that I think it's really a good time to be a Democrat." MSNBC News Live host Brewer then blurted out how "it's sort of like we're all rooting for everybody all at once."

3. Time on Kucinich: 'His Old Kooky Ideas Are Looking Pretty Good'
Time magazine is not going to play to the stereotype of only praising Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. They can find obscure Democratic presidential campaigns to praise. The infamous Joel "I Don't Support Our Troops" Stein has filed a piece praising fringy Dennis Kucinich, the candidate who would create a Department of Peace. In his "Nation" section article in the March 12 Time, "The Kucinich Conundrum," Stein acknowledged Kucinich is on the outer edges of political feasibility, and yet there's something so right in his "progressive" idealism: "And yet the universe has been going his way lately. Even his old kooky ideas are looking pretty good these days."

4. Tickets on Sale for MRC's DisHonors Awards/20th Anniversary Gala
Just over three weeks until the MRC's annual "DisHonors Awards," this year part of what will be the biggest event in the MRC's history -- our 20th Anniversary Gala -- and tickets are now on sale.


NBC: Iraqis Want U.S. to Stay, Anti-War
Effort Helping Insurgents

Visiting Iraq, NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams learned from Army officers that Iraqis want U.S. forces to remain in their country, from NBC News Baghdad reporter Richard Engel that Al-Sadr's insurgents have stepped down and are counting on pressure from anti-war opponents to provide them with victory, and from retired General and NBC News military analyst Wayne Downey that U.S. troops are proud of their mission. Traveling with Lieutenant General Ray Odierno for stories on his Monday newscast, Williams ran a clip of Army Colonel John Charlton proclaiming that Iraqis "do not want us to leave" and a soundbite from Army Lt. Colonel Charles Ferry who asserted: "The people here are very glad to see us." Williams marveled: "You just said, 'They don't want us to leave.' That's the tenth time today I've heard that. I've got to go back to the States and do a newscast that every night has another politician or 12 of them saying, 'We have got to get out of that godforsaken place.'"

To explain the decreased violence in Baghdad, Engel noted how "the militia decided they fought the U.S. two-and-a-half years ago, didn't have a lot of success. They decided this time they're going to wait it out, see if political pressure in the U.S. can help them win this time." Downey related how "every soldier that I ran across today I asked him: 'How do you feel about what's going on,'" and "without exception -- this was spontaneous, especially when you start talking to PFCs and Spec 4s, they're going to tell you the truth, no party line. Very proud of what they're doing. Very, very dedicated."

[This item was posted Monday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

During his first story on his trip, as aired on the March 5 NBC Nightly News, Williams related:
"This is what the General heard today about how warmly the locals now view the Americans."
U.S. Army Colonel John Charlton: "They do not want us to leave. They want to see the police come through."
U. S. Army Lt. Colonel Charles Ferry: "The people here are very glad to see us. They are very hesitant still because they're not sure if we're going to stay. They want us to stay."
Voice of Odierno?: "That's the issue."
Ferry: "That's the whole deal. If we stay down here and to keep beating down the insurgents."
Brian Williams, to one or more of the officers: "You just said, 'They don't want us to leave.' That's the tenth time today I've heard that. I've got to go back to the States and do a newscast that every night has another politician or 12 of them saying, 'We have got to get out of that godforsaken place.'"
Odierno: "They can talk about policy, okay, and that's what they have to do back there. My mission right now is to provide protection for the Iraqi people so this government can grow."

The MSNBC.com online version of the Williams story: www.msnbc.msn.com

At the end of his newscast, Williams stood at an outside location with Engel and Downey, as he noted how they felt safe enough to remove their bullet-proof vests. Engel explained the decrease in violence from Al-Sadr's insurgents in Sadr City:
"Some say they are just waiting to see how long the U.S. will stay and how long this surge will continue. It was obvious, the U.S. announced the surge, they said where the U.S. troops were going and the militia decided they fought the U.S. two-and-a-half years ago, didn't have a lot of success. They decided this time they're going to wait it out, see if political pressure in the U.S. can help them win this time."
Brian Williams: "And General, you and I heard sentiments we don't often hear today, the U.S. commanders quoting the Iraqis: 'please don't leave us.' And a lot of the U.S. fighters there today said they didn't want to leave this fight, they are dedicated to it."
Retired General Wayne Downing: "Brian, every single one of them, I ran into a lot of officers and NCOs that I served with -- every soldier that I ran across today I asked him: 'How do you feel about what's going on, what do you know about what is going on back in the states?' And without exception -- this was spontaneous, especially when you start talking to PFCs and Spec 4s, they're going to tell you the truth, no party line. Very proud of what they're doing. Very, very dedicated. Many of these guys, Brian, are back here on their second and third tours. These are one-year tours. Extremely well trained and very professional."

MSNBC's Brewer on Hillary and Obama:
We're Rooting for Them All

On Monday afternoon, MSNBC anchor Contessa Brewer discussed the competing Sunday speeches of 2008 Democratic presidential candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in Selma, Alabama. During the 3pm EST hour, Democratic strategist Julie Roginsky reeled off all the racial and cultural firsts that the upcoming primaries will have, including Hispanic candidate Bill Richardson, gushing: "There are so many firsts in this Democratic primary that I think it's really a good time to be a Democrat." MSNBC News Live host Brewer then blurted out how "it's sort of like we're all rooting for everybody all at once."

[This item was adopted from a Monday evening posting, by Scott Whitlock, on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org Hat tip to eagle-eyed NB reader Gary Hall for catching the comment.]

A transcript of the brief exchange, which aired at 3:10pm EST, amongst Brewer and her two in-studio guests:

Contessa Brewer: "Hey, take a good look, because you probably won't see this very often. Two Democratic presidential frontrunners and rivals together this weekend. They were commemorating a civil rights march in Selma, Alabama. Senators Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama spoke at two different churches. And Senator Clinton brought a famous guest star, her husband. Democratic strategist Julie Roginsky and Republican strategist Joe Watkins are both here. Nice to see you both with me."
Joe Watkins: "Great to be with you, Contessa."
Julie Roginsky: "Nice to see you."
Brewer: "You know, it wasn't just a chance to celebrate civil rights. This was a real opportunity for Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama to reach out to potential voters. According to recent polls, Barack Obama is gaining ground, Hillary Clinton is losing ground. Julie, why do you think that is?"
Roginsky: "Well, I think Hillary Clinton started out with a set of name recognition that nobody else in the Democratic field has. And I think as Barack Obama becomes more known, obviously it makes sense that he would, his name recognition and his numbers would go up. But I think what's important to note here is that this is a set of firsts, not just for the African-American community, but for women, for Hispanics and Bill Richardson. There are so many firsts in this Democratic primary that I think it's really a good time to be a Democrat."
Brewer: "It's sort of like we're all rooting for everybody all at once."
Watkins: "Until we find out where people stand on issues."

Time on Kucinich: 'His Old Kooky Ideas
Are Looking Pretty Good'

Time magazine is not going to play to the stereotype of only praising Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. They can find obscure Democratic presidential campaigns to praise. The infamous Joel "I Don't Support Our Troops" Stein has filed a piece praising fringy Dennis Kucinich, the candidate who would create a Department of Peace. In his "Nation" section article in the March 12 Time, "The Kucinich Conundrum," Stein acknowledged Kucinich is on the outer edges of political feasibility, and yet there's something so right in his "progressive" idealism: "And yet the universe has been going his way lately. Even his old kooky ideas are looking pretty good these days."

[This item is adopted from a Monday posting, by Tim Graham, on the MRC's NewsBusters.org blog: newsbusters.org ]

Stein elaborated: "His decision to allow Cleveland to default instead of selling its electric-utility company cost him re-election and landed him in a book about the worst mayors in American history, but he was later honored by the city council for refusing to sell, a move that saved customers nearly $200 million over 10 years. More inconceivable, less than two years ago, his office was visited by a stunning 6-ft.-tall Julianne Moore look-alike 31 years his junior, a Brit who was working for the American Monetary Institute. After some smooth wooing on his part ("I gave her a copy of my Department of Peace legislation and my e-mail address") and one date (at [Shirley] MacLaine's house), she agreed to marry him. If that happened to you, you'd think you could be President too."

Stein noted that Kucinich's singing and speeches get him rave reviews on YouTube, but the dream of nerdy President Dennis is just a dream, sigh:
"Kucinich will run all the way, waiting for that moment when he transforms from punch line to President. And he insists that he isn't frustrated that it hasn't happened yet. 'Not at all,' he says. 'The real test of power is whether you can endure the setbacks and still meet each day with integrity and courage.' That, though, is the test of moral fiber, not the test of power. The test of power is whether you can persuade others to do your will. And it may be that an earnest man with progressive ideas who still can't make a decent campaign poster will always fail that test."

For Stein's take in full: www.time.com

Back in January of 2006, Stein penned an op-ed for the Los Angeles Times in which he declared: "I don't support our troops....When you volunteer for the U.S. military, you pretty much know you're not going to be fending off invasions from Mexico and Canada. So you're willingly signing up to be a fighting tool of American imperialism, for better or worse....I'm not advocating that we spit on returning veterans like they did after the Vietnam War, but we shouldn't be celebrating people for doing something we don't think was a good idea."

That quote was published in the January 30, 2006 edition of the MRC's Notable Quotables: www.mediaresearch.org

Tickets on Sale for MRC's DisHonors Awards/20th
Anniversary Gala

Just under three weeks until the MRC's annual "DisHonors Awards," this year part of what will be the biggest event in the MRC's history -- our 20th Anniversary Gala: www.mediaresearch.org

Cal Thomas will serve as Master of Ceremonies and we'll have several conservative stars presenting and accepting the awards, including Ambassador John Bolton, radio talk show host Neal Boortz, columnist/author/provocateur Ann Coulter, FNC and radio host Sean Hannity, political strategist Mary Matalin, game show host Pat Sajak and former Maryland Lieutenant Governor Michael Steele. Plus, we'll have some big-name surprise guests.

Date: Thursday, March 29 at the Grand Hyatt in Washington, DC. Reception at 6pm, dinner and gala at 7pm. (Black-tie optional.)

Seats are $250.00 each, limited to two per individual unless you are an Associate or Trustee of the MRC. (Contribute $1,000 annually to earn Associate status; $5,000 annually to earn Trustee privileges.)

Every year we end up oversold, so if you want to ensure a seat, order ASAP.

Seats can only be purchased via phone. If you would like to reserve your seat, want more information on how to become an MRC Associate or Trustee, or information on purchasing a table for the evening, please contact Sara Bell at (800) 672-1423 between 9am and 6pm EST Monday through Friday. Or, e-mail her at: sbell@mediaresearch.org

The MRC accepts all major credit cards.

At each annual gala, we mockingly award the worst reporting of the year and then have a conservative leader accept the award in jest.

But the best reason to attend is to watch the videos of the nominated quotes and enjoy making fun of the media's misdirected left-wing reporting.

This year's award categories:

# Puppy Love Award

# Dan Rather Memorial Award for the Stupidest Analysis

# God, I Hate America Award

# Tin Foil Hat Award for Crazy Conspiracy Theories

# The I'm Not a Political Genius But I Play One on TV Award

If you didn't attend last year, this is what you missed:

Cal Thomas, Larry Kudlow, Tony Blankley Mark Levin, Jack Singlaub, Stan Evans, Linda Chavez, Ken Cribb and Ron Robinson highlighted the presentations and acceptances of MRC's "2006 DisHonors Awards: Roasting the Most Outrageously Biased Liberal Reporters of 2005," which were presented on Thursday night, March 30, before an audience of more than 900 packed into the Independence Ballroom of the Grand Hyatt hotel in Washington, D.C.

Following the presentation of the DisHonors Awards videos in five categories, a look at several unintentionally humorous clips from network newscasts and the audience picking the Quote of the Year, those in attendance watched a "Tribute to the American Military" video. It was preceded by a "Toast to the Fallen Comrade" and followed by remarks from Herman Cain, the former President of Godfather's Pizza and National Chairman of the MRC's Free Market Project.

DisHonors Awards winners were selected by a distinguished panel of 17 leading media observers, including Rush Limbaugh, Steve Forbes, Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham, Robert Novak and Mary Matalin, who served as judges.

Cal Thomas, a syndicated columnist and panelist on FNC's Fox Newswatch, served as Master of Ceremonies. Lawrence Kudlow, host of CNBC's Kudlow & Company and National Review Online's economics editor, was the first presenter of nominated video clips, followed by Washington Times Editorial Page Editor Tony Blankley and nationally syndicated radio talk show host Mark Levin.

In place of the journalist who won each award, a conservative accepted it in jest. Those standing in for the winners: Major General Jack Singlaub (Retired), radio talk show host and conservative commentator Linda Chavez, Ron Robinson, President of the Young America's Foundation, Ken Cribb, President of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute and a former Reagan administration official, and author Stan Evans, the founder of the National Journalism Center, who delivered an especially hilarious routine.

The evening began with welcoming remarks from Cal Thomas, an invocation by Reverend Robert Sirico, President of the Acton Institute, and the Pledge of Allegiance led by Colonel Robert Rust (Retired).

END Reprint of Summary of last year's event

To watch video of all of last year's nominated quotes and of the award presentations, check: www.mediaresearch.org

To read about and watch video from all of the past DisHonors Awards galas, go to: www.mediaresearch.org

Again, for the Web section on this year's upcoming gala: www.mediaresearch.org

-- Brent Baker