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CBS Hails 'Groundbreaking' New EPA Regulations on Climate Change, Skips Job Risk

CBS and NBC's morning shows on Monday avoided any mention of the potential job killing-harm that new Environmental Protection Agency rules will create. The three networks spent a scant 61 seconds total on the global warming regulations, but it was only Amy Robach on Good Morning America who raised a red flag. She pointed out: "The new rules will require power plants to cut Earth-warming pollution by 30 percent. Opponents say this will drive up energy costs and kill thousands of jobs." 

On CBS This Morning, co-host Amy Robach cheered, "This morning, the EPA announces a groundbreaking plan to cut power plant emissions blamed for global warming." She allowed that "carbon dioxide limits are a hot political issue," but the journalist quickly added, "This is America's first ever policy to limit those emissions and the EPA says power plants are the largest source of greenhouse gases in the U.S." [MP3 audio here.]

According to an analysis by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the carbon regulations mean: 

- Lower U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by $51 billion on average every year through 2030

- Lead to 224,000 fewer U.S. jobs on average every year through 2030

- Force U.S. consumers to pay $289 billion more for electricity through 2030

- Lower total disposable income for U.S. households by $586 billion through 2030 

This possibility went totally unmentioned on CBS This Morning. Over on NBC's Today, Natalie Morales highlighted the "sweeping proposal to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants as part of the Obama administration's climate change agenda." 

She, too, avoided the job loss angle of the story. The content of the new regulations broke Saturday night, but the networks skipped them on the Saturday evening and Sunday morning shows.  (It did come up on ABC's This Week.)  

Journalists have long ignored the economic cost of Obama's climate change goals. For instance, on January 17, 2008, the then-presidential candidate declared: 

BARACK OBAMA: So, if somebody wants to build a coal plant, they can — it’s just that it will bankrupt them, because they are going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that’s being emitted.

Where was this quote in network stories?

Transcripts of the three June 2 briefs can be found below: 

GMA

7:12AM ET

AMY ROBACH: Well, today the Obama administration takes a major step to tackle climate change. The new rules will require power plants to cut Earth-warming pollution by 30 percent. Opponents say this will drive up energy costs and kill thousands of jobs. 

Today

7:14 AM ET 

NATALIE MORALES: The Environmental Protection Agency unveils today a sweeping proposal to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants as part of the Obama administration's climate change agenda. 

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Carbon Emission Cuts; EPA to Unveil Sweeping Proposal Today]

The goal is to cut emissions 30 percent by 2030 with a rule expected to be final next year. The administration hopes the step will get other countries to act when negotiations on a new international treaty resume next year. 

CBS TM

7:11

NORAH O'DONNELL: And this morning, the EPA announces a groundbreaking plan to cut power plant emissions blamed for global warming. Carbon dioxide limits are a hot political issue in Washington. The new rules aimed to reduce carbon pollution by 30 percent in six years. This is America's first ever policy to limit those emissions and the EPA says power plants are the largest source of greenhouse gases in the U.S. 

— Scott Whitlock is Senior News Analyst at the Media Research Center. Follow Scott Whitlock on Twitter.