Appearance Alert
MRC's Bozell to appear on FNC's 'Kelly File' at 9:40pm ET

CBS Evening News Spikes Newly Found Obama 'Redistributive' Audio --10/28/2008


1. CBS Evening News Spikes Newly Found Obama 'Redistributive' Audio
YouTube postings over the weekend divulged a 2001 radio interview in which Barack Obama regretted that "the Supreme Court never ventured into the issues of redistribution of wealth, and sort of more basic issues of political and economic justice in this society," but though John McCain on Monday cited this new evidence of Obama's long-standing advocacy of redistributing wealth, the CBS Evening News offered nothing more than a McCain soundbite surrounded by reporter Chip Reid discrediting the criticism as he relayed the Obama campaign's charge McCain had made a "false, desperate attack" and Reid bemoaned: "If the events of today are any guide, this is a campaign that is taking an increasingly negative tone in the last week." In contrast, the NBC Nightly News at least ran a short audio clip of Obama from 2001: "The Supreme Court never ventured into the issues of redistribution of wealth." ABC's World News, in a piece by Ron Claiborne, aired a much longer audio soundbite from Obama.

2. Newsweek's Alter: Only Racism Could Prevent President Obama
America's either racist, or it will elect Obama. So wrote Newsweek columnist Jonathan Alter, who focused in his weekly column on imagining the "horror" scenario, titled "Why McCain Won: Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory: how that scenario could (but likely won't) play out." Alter's theory in a nutshell: If McCain wins, racism is the answer. "Millions of people in the rest of the world assume that Barack Obama cannot be elected because he is black," but Alter hoped "the common sense and decency of the American people will prove the skeptics wrong."

3. ABC's George Stephanopoulos: Only One VP is a Campaign Drag
On Monday's Good Morning America, former Democratic aide-turned journalist George Stephanopoulos downplayed the idea that both Sarah Palin and Joe Biden might be a drag on their respective presidential tickets. Responding to a question by co-host Robin Roberts about the two taking attention away from Senators Obama and McCain, Stephanopoulos opined: "But I think the bottom line here is that across all voters, across the last couple of months, Senator Biden has made voters more comfortable with Barack Obama." He added: "Governor Palin has made voters, overall, less comfortable with John McCain." While it's true that Governor Palin's numbers have fallen in the last few weeks, it's also apparent that the ABC network has contributed to that situation by aggressively criticizing Governor Palin, while downplaying gaffes by Democratic running mate Biden.

4. CBS's Early Show: Sarah Palin's Fashion A Top Campaign Issue
Monday's CBS Early Show made Sarah Palin's clothes shopping habits headline news as co-host Harry Smith declared: "Sarah Palin defends her shopping spree...We'll take you to the consignment store where she says she really shops." Only minutes later, Smith seemed to lament the distraction of the issue: "So much time and attention has been spent talking about John McCain's running mate in this -- in this case and, now it's -- they're defending themselves about clothes and all of these other things. Ones wonders if there's a presidential campaign going on here." Apparently Smith forgot that he shares responsibility for making it an issue in the first place.

5. Bernstein: McCain Hurt by Becoming a 'Captive of the Right Wing'
An emerging preview of the post-election media spin that McCain lost because he moved too far to "the right," with his pick of Sarah Palin as the smoking gun? On Monday night's Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, veteran journalist Carl Bernstein, now a political analyst for CNN, contended McCain is "in the difficulty he's in" because "he's really become a captive of the right wing of his party and its agenda and it shows, particularly through the pick of Sarah Palin." Bernstein's supposition came three days after Bob Schieffer of CBS News blamed McCain's situation on how, after the primaries, "instead of moving to the center, he moved to the right. He put Sarah Palin on the ticket which pleased the right but..."


CBS Evening News Spikes Newly Found Obama
'Redistributive' Audio

YouTube postings over the weekend divulged a 2001 radio interview in which Barack Obama regretted that "the Supreme Court never ventured into the issues of redistribution of wealth, and sort of more basic issues of political and economic justice in this society," but though John McCain on Monday cited this new evidence of Obama's long-standing advocacy of redistributing wealth, the CBS Evening News offered nothing more than a McCain soundbite surrounded by reporter Chip Reid discrediting the criticism as he relayed the Obama campaign's charge McCain had made a "false, desperate attack" and Reid bemoaned: "If the events of today are any guide, this is a campaign that is taking an increasingly negative tone in the last week."

In contrast, the NBC Nightly News at least ran a short audio clip of Obama from 2001: "The Supreme Court never ventured into the issues of redistribution of wealth." ABC's World News, in a piece by Ron Claiborne, aired a much longer audio soundbite from Obama: "One of the, I think, tragedies of the civil rights movement was because the civil rights movement became so court-focused, I think that there was a tendency to lose track of the political and community organizing and activities on the ground that are able to put together the actual coalitions of power through which you bring about redistributive change."

In his Monday night CBS Evening News story, Reid began with McCain attacking Obama on economic policy before maintaining "the focus on the economy soon became blurred as Republicans launched a series of new attacks on Obama." Reid cited an unnamed "independent Republican group" (National Republican Trust) which "announced plans to start airing attack ads featuring [Jeremiah] Wright" and "McCain himself jumped into the fray. He regularly accuses Obama of wanting to spread the wealth, but today he added a new line of attack." Viewers then heard from McCain: "In a radio interview that was revealed today, he said that quote, 'one of the tragedies of the civil rights movement' is that it didn't bring about a redistribution of wealth in our society."

Instead of playing an illustrative clip, as did ABC and NBC, Reid went immediately to the Obama campaign's retort: "The Obama campaign said McCain was taking a seven-year-old interview out of context and accused McCain of deciding to close out his campaign with the same false desperate attacks that have failed for months."

[This item, by the MRC's Brent Baker, was posted Monday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

The MRC's Eyeblast site has a four-minute audio clip of the interview on WBEZ-FM, a public station in Chicago, from September 6, 2001: www.eyeblast.tv

# Reid's story, on the Monday, October 27 CBS Evening News:

CHIP REID: In Cleveland today, John McCain sat down with his economic team before delivering a statement on what he called the fundamental differences between his economic plan and Barack Obama's.
JOHN MCCAIN: We both disagree with President Bush on economic policy. The difference is that he thinks taxes have been too low and I think, and I think that spending has been too high.
REID: But the focus on the economy soon became blurred as Republicans launched a series of new attacks on Obama.
AUDIO: This is Orson Swindle. John McCain and I were POWS together.
REID: Using the voice of one of McCain's closest friends, the Republican National Committee is paying for this new robo-call.
AUDIO OF SWINDLE: Obama and Democrats' politics endanger American lives. They are not qualified to lead our military and our country.
REID: And while McCain has ruled out attacking Obama with the words of his former pastor Jeremiah Wright, many Republicans disagree with that decision and today an independent Republican group announced plans to start airing attack ads featuring Wright later this week.
McCAIN: It's amazing that even at this late hour we are still learning more about Senator Obama.
REID: Campaigning in Dayton, Ohio, McCain himself jumped into the fray. He regularly accuses Obama of wanting to spread the wealth, but today he added a new line of attack.
JOHN McCAIN: In a radio interview that was revealed today, he said that quote, "one of the tragedies of the civil rights movement" is that it didn't bring about a redistribution of wealth in our society.
REID: The Obama campaign said McCain was taking a seven-year-old interview out of context and accused McCain of deciding to close out his campaign with the same false desperate attacks that have failed for months.
Now, McCain came here to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, after that trip to Ohio. He's giving his standard stump speech right now but, if the events of today are any guide, this is a campaign that is taking an increasingly negative tone in the last week. Katie?


# The story on McCain's day aired on ABC's World News:

RON CLAIBORNE: This is Ron Claiborne in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. John McCain was fighting today on two fronts, attacking Barack Obama as a tax-raiser while distancing himself from President Bush.
JOHN McCAIN: This is the fundamental difference between Senator Obama and me. The fundamental difference. We both disagree with President Bush on economic policy. The difference is that he thinks taxes have been too low, and I think, and I think that spending has been too high.
CLAIBORNE: In Dayton, Ohio, McCain blasted Obama for, he said, having once advocated the redistribution of wealth.
McCAIN: In a radio interview that was revealed today, he said that quote. "one of the tragedies of the civil rights movement" is that it didn't bring about a redistribution of wealth in our society.
CLAIBORNE: The Obama campaign called it a "false, desperate" attack. Here's what Obama told a Chicago radio station in 2001.
AUDIO OF BARACK OBAMA ON WBEZ RADIO IN 2001: One of the, I think, tragedies of the civil rights movement was because the civil rights movement became so court-focused, I think that there was a tendency to lose track of the political and community organizing and activities on the ground that are able to put together the actual coalitions of power through which you bring about redistributive change.
CLAIBORNE: This is McCain's fifth trip this month to Pennsylvania, a state hat has gone Democratic since 1988, but narrowly in the last two presidential elections. And many registered Democrats and independents are social conservatives.
PROFESSOR MICHAEL BERKMAN, PENN STATE: There's no early voting, so it's not like any votes are already locked in for Barack Obama. And Barack Obama did not run well here against Hillary Clinton. And so I think that probably gives the McCain camp some hope.
CLAIBORNE: And McCain will make his final argument later this week, the theme, his aides say, will be leadership and experience. The question, Charlie, is will enough voters be listening and persuaded to turn this race around?


# From the NBC Nightly News story on McCain:

KELLY O'DONNELL: ...Today, McCain continued his effort to separate himself from the two men who could deny him the White House -- Barack Obama and George Bush.
JOHN McCAIN: We both disagree with President Bush on economic policy. The difference is he thinks taxes have been too low, and I think that spending has been too high.
O'DONNELL: In must-win Ohio, McCain seized on something his campaign claims is another revealing Obama moment. This time, an old interview from 2001.
McCAIN: In a radio interview that was revealed today, he said that, quote, "one of the tragedies of the civil rights movement" is that it didn't bring about a redistribution of wealth in our society.
O'DONNELL: Obama was a state senator then.
AUDIO OF OBAMA ON WBEZ, SEPTEMBER 6, 2001: The Supreme Court never ventured into the issues of redistribution of wealth.
O'DONNELL: Obama's campaign called it a fake news controversy...

Newsweek's Alter: Only Racism Could Prevent
President Obama

America's either racist, or it will elect Obama. So wrote Newsweek columnist Jonathan Alter, who focused in his weekly column on imagining the "horror" scenario, titled "Why McCain Won: Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory: how that scenario could (but likely won't) play out." Alter's theory in a nutshell: If McCain wins, racism is the answer. "Millions of people in the rest of the world assume that Barack Obama cannot be elected because he is black," but Alter hoped "the common sense and decency of the American people will prove the skeptics wrong."

[This item, by the MRC;s Tim Graham, was posted Monday morning on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

For Alter's column in the November 3 issue, "Why McCain Won: Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory: how that scenario could (but likely won't) play out," at: www.newsweek.com

It sounds a little like Bryant Gumbel, who declared in 1989 that his NBC News special on racial attitudes "is not going to tell you whether or not you are a racist or a liberal." For more on Bryant Gumbel's 1989 statement on racial attitudes on NBC News, see the September 18, 1989 edition of MRC's Notable Quotables: www.mrc.org

Alter thinks less educated (and more racist) voters will be the difference if Obama loses:

In the end, the problem was the LIVs. That's short for "low-information voters"...Their allegiance to a candidate is as easily shed as a T-shirt. Several million moved to Obama through September and October; they'd heard he handled himself well in the debates. Then, in the last week, the LIVs swung back to the default choice: John McCain. Some had good reasons other than the color of Obama's skin to desert him; many more did not. In October, a study by the Associated Press estimated that Obama's race would cost him 6 percent. The percentage was smaller, but still enough to give the presidency to McCain.

...As it turned out, the real problem wasn't south Florida, where Hispanics came in surprisingly well for Obama. It was erosion in the critical I-4 corridor near Tampa and in the Panhandle, where the astonishing Republican margins among whites could be attributed only to race.

...But there was a reason Virginia hadn't gone Democratic since 1964. The transformation of the northern part of the state couldn't overcome a huge McCain margin among whites farther south. They weren't the racists of their parents' generation, but they weren't quite ready to vote for the unthinkable, either.

SUSPEND Excerpt

Alter can't imagine that some voters might feel that Obama doesn't have enough experience to be president. Apparently, that's an excuse for racism. Alter can't imagine that some voters might feel Obama is too liberal and will damage the economy with higher taxes. That must be another excuse for deep-seated loathing of a black president. Alter concluded with exactly the kind of didactic note that makes the "news" magazines sound like they'd much rather run the country than simply write about it:

At the start of the campaign season NEWSWEEK asked, "Is America Ready" for a black president? The answer: only if Obama proved close to a flawless candidate, and even then, we won't know for sure until Election Day. That doesn't mean Obama lost because all, or even most, McCain voters allowed race to be a factor. But enough did to change the outcome.

Democrats are despairing over the results, fearing they might never view their country in the same light again. Even many Republicans are subdued at the news of McCain's victory. Having expected him to lose, they know the GOP has now completed a sorry transition from the party of Lincoln to the party of cynicism. McCain, they're reasoning, might prove a fine president, but it shouldn't have happened like this.

It probably won't. Millions of people in the rest of the world assume that Barack Obama cannot be elected because he is black. They assume that the original sin of American history -- enshrined in our Constitution -- cannot be transcended. I go into next week's election with a different assumption -- that the common sense and decency of the American people will prove the skeptics wrong.

END of Excerpt

Newsweek's feeling about the voters -- are they idiots or will they vote for Obama? -- is based on whether they heeded Newsweek's four years of advice to get in line to support Obama. At the beginning of 2005, Alter wrote a sugary cover story on Obama, as Brent Bozell explained:

Obama was lauded as the "incredibly pragmatic" soul of civility who is "uniquely qualified to nudge the country toward the color purple" (merging the red states and blue states). He was all about "embracing our hybrid origins and transcending our often narrow-minded past."

For more on Alter's 2005 cover story on Obama, see Brent Bozell's January 5, 2005 column: www.mrc.org

Even back then, Alter was so in the tank for Obama he was praising the brand-new Senator's readiness for the White House with lines like "his expert grasp of foreign policy helped him bolt from the pack."

ABC's George Stephanopoulos: Only One
VP is a Campaign Drag

On Monday's Good Morning America, former Democratic aide-turned journalist George Stephanopoulos downplayed the idea that both Sarah Palin and Joe Biden might be a drag on their respective presidential tickets. Responding to a question by co-host Robin Roberts about the two taking attention away from Senators Obama and McCain, Stephanopoulos opined: "But I think the bottom line here is that across all voters, across the last couple of months, Senator Biden has made voters more comfortable with Barack Obama." He added: "Governor Palin has made voters, overall, less comfortable with John McCain."

While it's true that Governor Palin's numbers have fallen in the last few weeks, it's also apparent that the ABC network has contributed to that situation by aggressively criticizing Governor Palin, while downplaying gaffes by Democratic running mate Biden. Last Monday, ABC's "Political Radar" blog broke the story of the Delaware senator suggesting that Obama would be tested by an international crisis within the first six months of his (potential) presidency. The ABC network ignored the scoop for almost 24 hours. See an October 22 CyberAlert posting for more: www.mrc.org

On the September 29 GMA, reporter David Wright asserted that Palin's advisors "are trying to lower expectations. But even among some conservatives, expectations couldn't be any lower." And at the same time, the network ignored potentially damaging Biden gaffes, such as claiming that Franklin D. Roosevelt got on television at the onset of the Great Depression to calm the nerves of Americans. (He wasn't president and there was no television at the time.) ABC also skipped footage of the Democrat encouraging a man in a wheelchair to "stand up." See an September 30 CyberAlert posting for more: www.mrc.org

Monday's GMA featured a rare exception to this pattern. Correspondent Kate Snow actually wondered if Biden could be a drag on Obama's chances for victory. (This piece prompted the later question by Roberts.) During the earlier story, Snow highlighted a new McCain ad featuring Biden's "crisis" comments, as well as a skit on Saturday Night Live mocking him.

[This item, by the MRC's Scott Whitlock, was posted Monday afternoon on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

And while Stephanopoulos did allow during his segment, "Well, they've [Palin and Biden] become punch lines which isn't great for either candidate," he did not speculate on the role his own network might have played in making Americans "more comfortable" with the Democratic Senator.

In general, the ABC network has reiterated the idea that Palin isn't qualified. On the October 21 edition of Nightline, co-anchor Cynthia McFadden interviewed Hillary Clinton and asked about the Alaska governor. She goaded: "But it must rankle you, I mean, to be compared to Sarah Palin." Fellow Nightline host Terry Moran referred to Palin as the "blunda [sic] from the tundra" on October 22. See this October 24 CyberAlert posting for more on McFadden: www.mrc.org

And this one from the same day for more on Moran: www.mrc.org

A transcript of the exchange between Roberts and Stephanopoulos, and the previous Snow segment, which aired on October 27, follow:

7:11am
ROBIN ROBERTS: Now for the bottom line as we head into the campaign's final week, our chief Washington correspondent and host of "This Week" George Stephanopoulos joins us, of course, from Washington this morning. Bottom line here, George, the running mates, getting a lot of attention good, bad, indifferent?
GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Well, they've become punch lines which isn't great for either candidate. But I think the bottom line here is that across all voters, across the last couple of months, Senator Biden has made voters more comfortable with Barack Obama. Governor Palin has made voters, overall, less comfortable with John McCain.

7:08am
DIANE SAWYER: And while the candidates are polishing their final speeches, their running mates are running off as well, stealing the spotlights somewhat in this final stretch. And "Good Morning America" weekend anchor Kate Snow has more on that from Leesburg, Virginia. Kate?
KATE SNOW: Good morning, Diane. They're lining up behind me in a soggy state park to see Sarah Palin in just a little while. She says she's been trying to ignore this whole flap over the wardrobe. She says it's ridiculous. But as attention is focusing on the veeps on both sides, it's taking attention away from the top of the ticket.
SARAH PALIN: My own jacket, yes.
SNOW: Sarah Palin made it clear Sunday that she's no longer wearing the fancy duds paid for by the Republican National Committee. PALIN: I'm back to wearing my own clothes from my favorite consignment shop in Anchorage, Alaska.
SNOW: Oh, and her wedding ring?
PALIN: A $35 wedding ring from Hawaii that I bought myself.
SNOW: On Sunday, John McCain found himself talking fashion, explaining that about one-third of that $150,000 wardrobe was returned to stores.
SENATOR JOHN MCCAIN: She lives a frugal life. She and her family are not wealthy. She and her family were thrust into this and some third of that money is given back. The rest will be donated to charity.
SNOW: Behind the scenes, things are getting ugly, all weekend, stories filled with anonymous quotes and nasty and finger pointing, charges that Palin is a diva who blames her handlers for a botched rollout and is starting to look out for her own political future.
KARL ROVE: It's a sad sight to see. Nobody makes themselves look good. And it's generally a sign that people are throwing in the towel and thinking they're going to lose.
SNOW: But the election isn't over. And Obama is also explaining for his number two.
SENATOR BARACK OBAMA: Joe sometimes engages in rhetorical flourishes.
MATTHEW DOWD: If you look at all the news reporting, Joe Biden and Sarah Palin are getting almost as much reporting as their leading nominees. And that is not a position either campaign wants to be in.
SNOW: That comment Joe Biden made at a Seattle fund-raiser more than a week ago-
SENATOR JOE BIDEN: We're going to have an international crisis.
SNOW: -is still haunting the campaign. The McCain campaign set it to sinister music.
BIDEN [in ad]: I guarantee you it's gonna happen.
ANNOUNCER [in ad]: It doesn't have to happen.
SNOW: Biden avoided questions, but "Saturday Night Live" had fun with it.
[SNL clip]
"JOE BIDEN": And when this crisis hits, and it will, we may cede Florida back to Spain! Or Alaska to the Russians!
SNOW: Sometime early this week, Governor Palin's campaign tells us they will release information about her medical history, once again drawing attention to her and away from the issues John McCain would probably have voters be focused on in these last days? Robin?

CBS's Early Show: Sarah Palin's Fashion
A Top Campaign Issue

Monday's CBS Early Show made Sarah Palin's clothes shopping habits headline news as co-host Harry Smith declared: "Sarah Palin defends her shopping spree...We'll take you to the consignment store where she says she really shops." Only minutes later, Smith seemed to lament the distraction of the issue: "So much time and attention has been spent talking about John McCain's running mate in this -- in this case and, now it's -- they're defending themselves about clothes and all of these other things. Ones wonders if there's a presidential campaign going on here." Apparently Smith forgot that he shares responsibility for making it an issue in the first place.

At the top of the show, correspondent Jeff Glor reported that McCain "defended the woman he's running with. Following reports of rising tensions inside Sarah Palin's inner circle and the flap over those high-end designer clothes she wore at the convention." Glor added: "Palin, campaigning with the View's Elizabeth Hasselbeck, also addressed the $150,000 shopping spree." He played a clip of Hasselbeck: "Let me tell you, this is deliberately sexist." However, Glor never explained that Hasselbeck was talking about media coverage of Palin, instead he concluded: "The Alaskan governor said her wedding ring only cost $35 and that she usually buys her clothes from a consignment shop in Alaska."

Smith wondering if the Palin clothing controversy was a distraction: newsbusters.org ]

[This item, by Kyle Drennen, was posted Monday afternoon on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

In the 7:30AM half hour, co-host Julie Chen investigated that Alaska consignment shop: "On the campaign trail yesterday, Governor Sarah Palin again addressed the criticism she has received over the $150,000 that the Republican National Committee spent to dress her and her family. She said she likes to shop in a consignment store called Out of the Closet. The owner is Ellen Arv -- Arvold and she joins us now."

Chen throughly interrogated Arvold: "So how long has Governor Palin shopped at your store?...What does she usually buy at your store? And does she also shop for her entire family there?...And, Ellen, what is the price range of your women's wear?...And how much does Governor Palin typically spend at your store?...And would you say your clothes look much different than what we've been seeing her wear on the campaign trail?" Arvold defended Palin: "...no, I don't think her style has changed too much. I have only seen a few pieces that she's bought here on the campaign trail, but, no, I -- you know, I think she looks great." To that, Chen replied: "Hey, for $150,000, she better look fantastic."

Here is the full transcript of the Glor segment:

HARRY SMITH: This is the final full week of the 2008 campaign. Barack Obama is pressing in on states that were once GOP strongholds and John McCain is on the defensive about himself and his running mate. Early Show national correspondent Jeff Glor is in Cleveland with more this morning. Good morning, Jeff.

JEFF GLOR: Harry, good morning to you. Both candidates will be here in Ohio today. Both will be making their closing arguments this week, in a word, John McCain's will be about experience. Barack Obama's, about change. Barack Obama never misses a chance to link John McCain to George Bush. So when McCain said Sunday that he and the president shared a common philosophy, Obama pounced.
BARACK OBAMA: I guess that was John McCain finally giving us a little straight talk, owning up to the fact that he and George Bush actually have a whole lot in common.
GLOR: The Democratic nominee continues drawing enormous crowds. A hundred thousand in Denver.
OBAMA: Goodness gracious!
GLOR: Those numbers, along with Obama's double digit lead in the polls, have led some to accuse his campaign of overconfidence. Criticisms he's heard.
OBAMA: We're going to have to struggle. We are going to have to fight every single one of those nine days to move this country in a new direction. We cannot let up and I know you will not let up because you want change in America.
GLOR: McCain, meanwhile, pushed back at the suggestion he's anything but his own man.
JOHN MCCAIN: I am a Republican. I respect the President of the United States, but the fact is I am not George Bush.
GLOR: And defended the woman he's running with. Following reports of rising tensions inside Sarah Palin's inner circle and the flap over those high-end designer clothes she wore at the convention.
MCCAIN: Look. She lives a frugal life. She and her family are not wealthy.
GLOR: Palin, campaigning with the View's Elizabeth Hasselbeck, also addressed the $150,000 shopping spree.
SARAH PALIN: Those clothes, they are not my property, just like the lighting and the staging and everything else that the RNC purchased.
ELIZABETH HASSELBECK: Let me tell you, this is deliberately sexist.
GLOR: The Alaskan governor said her wedding ring only cost $35 and that she usually buys her clothes from a consignment shop in Alaska. So both candidates will be in Ohio, but also Pennsylvania today. Expect the McCain campaign, especially, to spend a ton of time in Pennsylvania this week, a state they now consider a near must-win if they're to win the presidency. Harry.
SMITH: Alright, Jeff Glor in Cleveland this morning, thanks so much.

Here is the full transcript of the Chen segment:

7:00AM TEASE:
HARRY SMITH: Sarah Palin defends her shopping spree.
SARAH PALIN: Those clothes, they are not my property.
SMITH: We'll take you to the consignment store where she says she really shops.

7:17AM TEASE:
MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ: Coming up here, case clothed? We'll take you to the store in Alaska where Sarah Palin says she really shops.

7:21AM TEASE:

JULIE CHEN: So guy, you know Sarah Palin has received a lot of criticism for the money spent on her wardrobe, $150,000. Well, she says she normally shops at a consignment store and we're going to take you there in our next half hour. We'll be right back.

7:30AM TEASE:
SARAH PALIN: Those clothes, they are not my property just like the lighting and the staging, and everything else that the RNC purchased. I'm not taking them with me. I'm back to wearing my own clothes from my favorite consignment shop in Anchorage, Alaska.
RODRIGUEZ: And here it is, her favorite consignment shop in Alaska. The clothing store where Governor Palin says she really shops. We'll talk with the owner this morning and see what kind of clothes the Governor likes to wear and what you can buy there for $150,000. Just imagine, the whole store.
[LAUGHTER BY HARRY SMITH, RODRIGUEZ, AND JULIE CHEN]
CHEN: The whole store, right.

7:31AM SEGMENT:
JULIE CHEN: On the campaign trail yesterday, Governor Sarah Palin again addressed the criticism she has received over the $150,000 that the Republican National Committee spent to dress her and her family. She said she likes to shop in a consignment store called Out of the Closet. The owner is Ellen Arv -- Arvold and she joins us now. Ellen, good morning.
ELLEN ARVOLD: Good morning, Julie.
CHEN: So how long has Governor Palin shopped at your store?
ARVOLD: She started shopping here while she was running for governor, so it's been about three years.
CHEN: Were you surprised when she walked in?
ARVOLD: Not really. When she first came in, you know, I recognized her, but I'd never met her. She was with her daughter and they were just having fun. She had a campaign button on, but I wasn't surprised. Alaska's a very small state. There are only 600,000 people here, so, you know, you're never surprised to see somebody well known.
CHEN: What does she usually buy at your store? And does she also shop for her entire family there?
ARVOLD: She shops for herself mostly, Julie, but she often brings her daughters with her and they will pick out some things for themselves. She likes jackets. She buys kind of classic, feminine fitted jackets. She likes leather jackets. Her girls have bought jeans here and also some jackets and knit tops.
CHEN: And, Ellen, what is the price range of your women's wear?
ARVOLD: Oh, my gosh. We range from, you know, a knit top for $16 to a, you know, Chloe handbag for $800, but our prices are generally very reasonable. I would say a normal price for a jacket would be between $40 and, you know, $100.
CHEN: And how much does Governor Palin typically spend at your store?
ARVOLD: Well, I really hate to say that, Julie, because, you know, she's a client and I value her privacy. But I think she could probably come in and buy our whole store three times over for $150,000.
CHEN: [Laughter] And would you say your clothes look much different than what we've been seeing her wear on the campaign trail?
ARVOLD: I'm sorry, I didn't hear your question, Julie.
CHEN: Would you say that the clothes you sell look much different than what we've been seeing her wear on the campaign trail?
ARVOLD: I don't really think her style has changed too much. She still wears beautiful suits, tailored jackets that are feminine, but still classic. I've seen her wear, you know, her typical high heels and boots. So, no, I don't think her style has changed too much. I have only seen a few pieces that she's bought here on the campaign trail, but, no, I -- you know, I think she looks great.
CHEN: Hey, for $150,000, she better look fantastic. Ellen Arvold, thank you. You're a great sport. Thanks a lot.
ARVOLD: Thank you. You're welcome.
CHEN: You're welcome.

Bernstein: McCain Hurt by Becoming a
'Captive of the Right Wing'

An emerging preview of the post-election media spin that McCain lost because he moved too far to "the right," with his pick of Sarah Palin as the smoking gun? On Monday night's Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, veteran journalist Carl Bernstein, now a political analyst for CNN, contended McCain is "in the difficulty he's in" because "he's really become a captive of the right wing of his party and its agenda and it shows, particularly through the pick of Sarah Palin." Bernstein's supposition came three days after Bob Schieffer of CBS News blamed McCain's situation on how, after the primaries, "instead of moving to the center, he moved to the right. He put Sarah Palin on the ticket which pleased the right but..."

Bernstein, formerly with the Washington Post and Time magazine, lamented on the Monday night/Tuesday morning CBS show: "I think he's abandoned the principles of his campaign in 2000 and that's probably why he's in the difficulty he's in." He elaborated: "The campaign of 2000 was built about being a really independent-spirited American politician and now he's really become a captive of the right wing of his party and its agenda and it shows, particularly through the pick of Sarah Palin."

[This item, by the MRC's Brent Baker, was posted late Monday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

The October 27 CyberAlert item, "CBS's Schieffer: McCain Doomed Because 'He Moved to the Right,'" recounted:

Just after CBS Evening News anchor Katie Couric noted how there is "some finger-pointing already going on" in the McCain-Palin campaign, CBS's Bob Schieffer did a little finger-pointing of his own as he blamed John McCain's presumed impending loss on his supposed move "to the right." Schieffer observed Friday night that "with this continuing bad economic news, I think it's going to be very hard for any Republican, even one who says he's a maverick, like John McCain." The host of Face the Nation then offered his take on "what's going to make it even harder," that after the primaries: "Instead of moving to the center, he moved to the right. He put Sarah Palin on the ticket which pleased the right but, as we're now seeing in these polls, her appeal does not go much beyond that."

For that CyberAlert in full: www.mediaresearch.org

-- Brent Baker