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Bill Maher Goes Out with Another Conspiracy: 'We Need a War All the Time So We Can...Buy Oil'

Catching up from Friday night, on the last Real Time with Bill Maher on HBO until September, Maher insisted "I'm not trying to be a conspiracy theorist," but then proceeded to assert the Defense Department "uses more oil than anywhere else to kill people in the Middle East to get fuel to fight wars," so "I do think there's something - just the way the pharmaceutical companies sometimes come up with a pill before they come up with the disease - I think maybe we need a war all the time so we can wear out equipment and buy oil."

Maher's claim came during a one-on-one with far-left film director Oliver Stone, who is producing a ten-hour documentary for Showtime, Secret History of America, about how, as Maher agreed, "America always does seem to need an enemy." When Stone maintained the Cold War was fueled by an exaggerated fear of communism, Maher jumped in: "I'd like to blame it on oil."

He expounded:

The United States Defense Department is the largest procurer of oil in the world, it uses more oil than anywhere else to kill people in the Middle East to get fuel to fight wars. It's sort of a cycle of life thing. Now, I'm not trying to be a conspiracy theorist. But I do think there's something - just the way the pharmaceutical companies sometimes come up with a pill before they come up with the disease - I think maybe we need a war all the time so we can wear out equipment and buy oil.

Three weeks earlier, on the May 21 program, Maher offered this great insight into the Gulf of Mexico oil leak:

Do you think BP could end this oil gushing out of the ocean if they just blew up the well and tapped it and they are not doing so because there's still money to be made from the oil coming out of the well?

Remember these the next time a MSNBC lefty derides a conservative for some "crazy" belief.

- Brent Baker is Vice President for Research and Publications at the Media Research Center. Click here to follow him on Twitter.