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Liberal Obama supporters whine, and the news media jumps. There was an outcry over the supposedly unfair and disgraceful questions poised to Barack Obama by ABC's Charles Gibson and George Stephanopoulos at Wednesday night's Democratic presidential debate, and media reporter Jacques Steinberg dutifully files " Who Lost the Debate? Moderators, Many Say ." Obama's army may not find questions about his flag pin and relationship to Weathermen terrorist William Ayers relevant, but many do. And it's not as if there are deep divides between the candidates that should be discussed instead. Both Obama and Clinton favor universal health care, are... continue reading
Globe-trotting Times reporter Raymond Bonner revealed his ideological hand in his review of four books about the war on terror in the March 18 edition of the left-wing New York Review of Books. "Justice delayed is justice denied" is a guiding principle of the American criminal justice system. The Bush administration has ignored this principle with impunity, and America's image abroad has suffered greatly as a result. .... As the Bush administration, in the weeks after the September 11 attacks, began hurriedly drafting rules to try suspects, the most senior military lawyers, from all four services, were "appalled" at the... continue reading
Another network newscast and guess what – something else to be afraid of. This time, it’s a “turf war.” ABC’s April 17 “World News with Charles Gibson” took a look at dangers of athletic fields with artificial turf in “the American landscape” and warned viewers of the potential exposure to lead. “It’s become part of the American landscape – synthetic turf, durable and soft,” ABC correspondent Sharyn Alfonsi said. “It’s everywhere, from stadiums to neighborhood soccer fields. But now, questions over whether those fields are safe. Health officials in New Jersey randomly tested synthetic turf fields across the state. Two... continue reading
For only the second time in 85 years, Time magazine abandoned the traditional red border it uses on its cover. The occasion – to push more global warming alarmism. The cover of the April 21 issue of Time took the famous Iwo Jima photograph by Joe Rosenthal of the Marines raising the American flag and replaced the flag with a tree. The cover story by Bryan Walsh calls green “the new red, white and blue.” Donald Mates, an Iwo Jima veteran, told the Business & Media Institute on April 17 that using that photograph for that cause was a “disgrace.”... continue reading
For only the second time in 85 years, TIME magazine abandoned the traditional red border it uses on its cover. The occasion – to push more global warming alarmism. The cover of the April 21 issue of TIME took the famous Iwo Jima photograph by Joe Rosenthal of the Marines raising the American flag and replaced the flag with a tree. The cover story by Bryan Walsh calls green “the new red, white and blue.” Donald Mates, an Iwo Jima veteran, told the Business & Media Institute on April 17 that using that photograph for that cause was a “disgrace.”... continue reading
Take cover, ABC! Incoming! “[Charles Gibson and George Stephanopoulos] disgraced the American voters, and in fact even disgraced democracy itself.” – Will Bunch, Philadelphia Daily News “Perhaps the most embarrassing performance by the media in a major presidential debate in years.” – Greg Mitchell, Editor & Publisher “… all the substance of a Beavis and Butt-Head marathon.” – Walter Shapiro, Salon “… petty, shallow, process-obsessed…utterly divorced from the actual issues that Americans want to talk about.” – Andrew Sullivan, The Atlantic “…Charlie Gibson and George Stephanopoulos turned in shoddy, despicable performances.” – Tom Shales, The Washington Post What could ABC's... continue reading
“At this vital juncture in the Earth’s history, it’s clear that the American people are looking for a presidential candidate who will take climate change ‘very seriously.’” That’s how Jerry Adler began his piece in the April 14 issue of Newsweek, focusing on “Environment and Leadership.” He was mocking President George W. Bush’s words from the 2000 presidential campaign. Bush, of course, has changed his rhetoric since then, announcing on April 16 that he would like to see a halt in the growth of greenhouse gas emissions by 2025. In any case, however, Adler’s statement was highly inaccurate. In a... continue reading
You might think the networks harping on airlines for weeks over inspection controversies, delayed flights and ticket prices, might feel compelled to at least acknowledge some good news about the industry. But ABC “World News with Charles Gibson” or CBS “Evening News” didn’t. Both those April 16 broadcasts ignored new statistics showing the U.S. airline industry had zero fatal accidents in 2007. Unlike CBS and ABC, NBC “Nightly News” anchor Brian Williams reported the figures in a brief segment near the end of the half-hour. “World News,” which has been especially hostile toward the recently announced merger of Delta Air... continue reading
So far, the Times' coverage of Pope Benedict XVI on his American trip has been mixed. On the sour side is a long story on Thursday by Daniel Wakin (with the often-antagonistic Ian Fisher contributing reporting) dwelling on a 2006 comment made by the pope which Muslims took offense at, in " Wary Reception Among Muslims Who Recall Pontiff's Remark About Muhammad ." The Muslim boys at Xaverian High School in Brooklyn pass under the stone gaze of the Virgin Mary every morning, and crucifixes adorn the classrooms where they receive a solid Catholic education. The school band is to... continue reading
In early April, Times Executive Editor Bill Keller discussed his recent book "The Tree Shaker: The Story of Nelson Mandela," a children's book on the life of South African leader Nelson Mandela, on the Times' " Ask A Reporter " site. The project is aimed at schoolchildren, who submit questions to selected Times reporters about the job of reporting. The reporters generally offer bland, follow-your-dreams stuff to the audience of aspiring journalists or curious students, but Keller's response to one student's question might raise some eyebrows. A New York City 12 th grader asked Keller: "What do you think of... continue reading