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Media Censor 40 Days for Life

Journalists hide anti-abortion events once again.

As thousands gather across the world in a campaign against abortion, one group will likely remain absent: the media. 

September 25 marked the beginning of the fall 2013 40 Days for Life, an international pro-life campaign of prayer and fasting for the unborn and their mothers held in 306 cities this year. The Washington, D.C. chapter held a vigil to raise awareness the night before, hosting as speakers Catholic Information Center’s Director Father Arne Panula and Susan B. Anthony List’s Deputy Director Billy Valentine. No media attended other than the Media Research Center. 

The 40 Days for Life campaign boasts 575,000 participants and over 7,500 babies saved through participants who pray outside of Planned Parenthoods and other abortion clinics for 40 days. 

Speaking in front of the Washington, D.C. Planned Parenthood, Valentine stressed “incredible” gains of the pro-life movement in 2013, from the 44 abortion clinics closed to the new House of Representatives’ legislation “that saves an entire class of unborn children starting at 20 weeks.” He credited the horrendous details that surfaced in the multiple murder trial of abortionist Kermit Gosnell and “the actions of many of you here on Twitter and Facebook forcing the media to cover [the case].” 

Valentine also recognized “177 pro-life laws have been passed” over the last three years in state legislatures. 

Fr. Panula commenced the vigil with prayer for the unborn, mothers, and fathers and interceded that the passers-by who see 40 Days for Life participants “will in some way be touched also to recognize how important this issue is for the well-being for the life of our country.” 

A search of the networks showed no coverage on 40 Days for Life – ever. The Media Research Center in the past covered vigils in Fall 2012 and Spring 2013.

— Katie Yoder is Staff Writer, Joe and Betty Anderlik Fellow in Culture and Media at the Media Research Center. Follow Katie Yoder on Twitter.