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CNN: Gore Still 'Bitter' Over Presidential Defeat

     Former Vice President and global warming cheerleader Al Gore still hasn’t forgotten the past.

 

     During his December 10 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in Oslo, Gore reminded his audience of his defeat to President George W. Bush in 2000.

     Former Vice President and global warming cheerleader Al Gore still hasn’t forgotten the past.

 

     During his December 10 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in Oslo, Gore reminded his audience of his defeat to President George W. Bush in 2000.

 

     “Seven years ago tomorrow, I read my own political obituary in a judgment that seemed to me harsh and mistaken – if not premature,” Gore said. “But that unwelcome verdict also brought a precious if painful gift – an opportunity to search for fresh new ways to serve my purpose.”

     That came across as “bitter” to CNN “American Morning” co-anchor John Roberts.

 

     “[A]nd also very interesting at the beginning of his speech, it seems that the wounds of seven years ago are still bitter and still pretty obvious because he said, ‘Seven years ago tomorrow, I read my political obituary. I thought the judgment was harsh, if not mistaken and premature,’” Roberts said. “Of course, he was denied the presidency of the United States by the Supreme Court – or at least he thought he was denied it.”

 

     However, during the acceptance speech, Gore added a new wrinkle to his already radical “planetary emergency” fighting initiatives – a ban on new coal plants.

 

     “We also need a moratorium on the construction of any new generating facility that burns coal without the capacity to safely trap and store carbon dioxide,” Gore said.

 

     And Gore’s idea of curbing lost jobs from his “bold initiatives?” A massive wealth redistributing carbon tax.

 

     “And most important of all, we need to put a price on carbon – with a CO2 tax that is then rebated back to the people, progressively, according to the laws of each nation, in ways that shift the burden of taxation from employment to pollution. This is by far the most effective and simplest way to accelerate solutions to this crisis.”

 

     Gore also used his European appearance to take a few stabs at his own country, the United States and more surprisingly, China.

 

     “But the outcome will be decisively influenced by two nations that are now failing to do enough – the United States and China,” Gore said. “While India is also growing fast in importance, it should be absolutely clear that it is the two largest CO2 emitters – and most of all, my own country – that will need to make the boldest moves or stand accountable before history for their failure to act.”

 

     So what sort of impression does Gore global warming activism have on CNN?

 

     “Jerry Lewis?” asked CNN correspondent Miles O’Brien, responding to a comparison between Lewis and Gore – who are both popular with Europeans. “Could Al Gore share something in common with the ‘Nutty Professor,’ loved mostly overseas? Well, it all comes down to politics. And many Americans view the Nobel Prize through a political prism.”

 

Related Links:  

BMI's Special Report "Fire & Ice: Journalists have warned of climate change for 100 years, but can't decide weather we face an ice or warming"

 

Climate of Bias: BMI's page devoted entirely to global warming and climate change in the media.

 

Gore Wins Thanks to Media's Fever Pitch on Global Warming: a look at how journalists contributed to his new award.